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Media

Resources

 P R E S S   R E L E A S E S

IN DATE ORDER BELOW:

THE OTTER OSCARS

There have been many otters called Oscar over the years – including one in the Democratic Republic of Congo and another in the Philippines. There have also been Oscar Otter toys and books. So when it came to choosing the name for a new award scheme as part of the Year of the Otter, the name was obvious – the Otter Oscars. (Of course, these Oscars ARE every bit as, if not more, important as those ‘other’ Oscars across the pond).

 

 

 

 

CHAMPIONING THE OTTER IN CHINA – BRITISH CONSERVATIONISTS TRAILBLAZE

 

2016 is the YEAR OF THE OTTER and in September the British-based International Otter Survival Fund (IOSF) will venture into China for a training workshop to champion otters and wetlands conservation.  The workshop will be in Zhuhai, from 5-10 September, and it is already attracting media interest in China.

 

BABY OTTER CROSSES OVER THE SEA TO SKYE - ON THE FERRY

 

 

A baby otter has taken the old traditional ferry crossing on board the “Glenachulish” from Glenelg to Kylerhea to get help on the Isle of Skye. 

 

 

WE'VE HAD THE BAFTAS AND THE OSCARS - NOW IT'S TIME FOR THE OTTER OSCARS!  The International Otter Survival Fund has declared 2016 to be the Year of the Otter. As part of this special year, with the objective to draw attention to the plight of the world’s otters, and to raise funds for their conservation, the IOSF are launching a new award scheme for outstanding achievements in otter conservation globally – The Otter Oscars.

2016 – THE YEAR OF THE OTTERThe International Otter Survival Fund (IOSF) is launching 2016 as the Year of the Otter.  The aim is to draw attention to the severe threat to the survival of otters.  Of the 13 species found worldwide, 12 are declining in number and IOSF is now at the frontier of otter conservation, particularly in Africa and Asia.

 

 

Otters of the World in trouble in 2016. In the UK we are constantly hearing that otters are “everywhere”, but what exactly is the true situation?

 

 

SCOTTISH CONSERVATIONISTS LEAD THE WAY IN OTTER CONSERVATION IN AFRICA - THE PLIGHT OF SMALLER ENDANGERED ANIMALS NEEDS TO BE URGENTLY ADDRESSED... - 30 June 2015

OTTERS WORLDWIDE ARE IN SEVERE TROUBLE - 12 January 2015

UNIQUE NEW BOOK PROVIDES FURTHER INSIGHTS INTO THE WORLD OF THE ELUSIVE OTTER - 30 October 2014

INTERNATIONAL OTTER AWARENESS DAY - 22 May 2014

HEALTH OF SCOTLAND'S OTTERS TO BE INVESTIGATED IN A NEW STUDY27 February 2014

CONSERVATIONISTS KICK-START PROJECT IN HUNGARY FOR OTTERS AND BIRDS 15  September 2013

OTTER CHARITY'S CONSERVATION WORK RECOGNISED BY TV AWARD17 April 2013

EVIL PEST? DEADLY? MARAUDING? MENACE? DOES THE OTTER DESERVE SUCH BAD PRESS? 14 February 2013

IOSF HEADS FOR JAVA 14 February 2013

ASLEEP IN THE HAY - 24 December 2012

OTTER CONSERVATIONISTS LAUNCH FISHERIES INITIATIVE - 28 June 2012

 

ASLEEP IN THE HAY

Two little otter cubs sleep safely in their crib of hay at the International Otter Survival Fund’s sanctuary on the Isle of Skye, Scotland.

But it might have been so different.  Bubble and Squeak were found abandoned in Cumbria two weeks ago.  Initially they were left to see if Mum would come back but the next morning they were found crying and covered in frost.  They were taken first to the Aquarium of the Lakes where they were cared for until they were strong enough for their journey to their new home on Skye.

Grace Yoxon, Director of IOSF, said “Bubble and Squeak are such gorgeous wee otters and it is so funny to watch them as they climb all over each other to reach the fish!  It is always better to bring up two cubs together as they get the otter company they need and one will learn from the other.  At the moment they are in an indoor cub unit but when they are bigger they will move to outdoor pens.  They will stay on Skye until they are about 12-15 months as this is the normal age at which cubs will leave their mothers.  They will then return to Cumbria for release.  It is really important that we keep human contact to a minimum as if they become tame we cannot release them back to the wild where they belong.”

Regular updates about the cubs can be found on the IOSF Blog (http://www.otter.org/IOSFBlog.aspx) and they are also on the Otter Webcam (http://www.otter.org/webcam.aspx)

24 December 2012

ENDS

 

 

Otter conservationists launch fisheries initiative

There is very little scientific evidence to back up recent claims, across the media, that otter numbers have greatly increased. Otters do not exist in the vast numbers as suggested, with recent figures quoting the UK population being around 10,000.  There is no scientific evidence for this figure - it is just an educated guess.

Naturally, because of the publicity there are growing concerns from fisheries relating to otters, and their impact on fish stocks. Otters may have a local impact, but there are clearly other reasons for reduction in fish stocks and these should also be taken into consideration. Otters and fish being vital elements of freshwater ecosystems it is important, therefore, to maintain biodiversity.

In order to address the gap in evidence and establish accurate information, the International Otter Survival Fund is spearheading an initiative to establish a working group of otter experts and representatives from the fishery community. This will ensure that up-to-date, precise, data can be gathered, practical advice can be gained, and solutions provided for current problems.

To determine the way forward, the IOSF have scheduled a one day conference bringing together interested parties from across the UK and Europe - otter scientists, representatives from fishery organisations, wildlife trusts, environmental, biodiversity and conservation
agencies, fish farmers, koi carp keepers and anglers, as well as representatives from organisations from Austria and Hungary who have been involved in these issues. An invitation to attend is not required - delegates from either field are welcome to
attend.

Amongst the subjects contained in the conference programme are:

* otter ecology, population numbers and distribution (past and present), survey methods, and the legal protection of the species.

* threats to fish stocks - environmental damage to rivers, drought conditions, disease, other predators (including invasive species).

* fishery concerns - how to protect fish stocks.

* working with otters - an example will be presented from a Scottish fishery, who is successfully encouraging wildlife (including otters).

Following the conference, a working group of interested parties will be formed to agree the way forward for further data to be gathered and more mutual collaboration. It is envisaged that the group will comprise 10 members across the otter and fishery community.

The conference is taking place on Wednesday, 7 November 2012, at the Apex International Hotel, Edinburgh - with the first working group meeting scheduled for early 2013.

Dr Paul Yoxon, IOSF Head of Operations, said “The data simply isn’t available to say that otters are everywhere.  On the one hand we are being told that there is a drought and fish are having to be rescued from drying rivers and on the other hand we are hearing that there are loads of otters.  Both cannot be true.  But instead of arguing we want to work WITH people involved in fishing to resolve conflicts before they become serious.  We hope as many fishermen as possible will join us and help us preserve fish stocks, otters and the biodiversity of our country”